Money Talk With Slater

Making Money Across the Board

Monthly archives "August 2017"

What Happened to US Savings Bonds?

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There was a moment when billions of dollars in U.S. savings bonds were given for weddings, graduations, birthdays, or just because. Those days are over. After selling billions of dollars of saving bonds every year, the Treasury is selling less than $50 million right now.

An older style EE Bond

What happened to U.S. Savings bonds? The government messed with the interest rate formula, making them unattractive as an investment by fixing rates for the lifetime of the savings bond. Then in ‘12, the government no longer offered paper savings bonds, eliminating their attractiveness as gifts. Furthermore, the Treasury no longer marketed savings bonds, probably due to the fact that the government was getting a big debt by overspending. They didn’t want to bring attention to the fact that it needed to borrow money.

U.S. Savings bonds have had a long and detailed history, beginning with Series A-D bonds, provided in the depression to offer folks an enticement to save correctly. The Series E bond was started in April of 1941 by as a way of financing World War II. These bonds, offered as an American investment, had an initial 10-year maturity and were offered at a reduction of face value. They had an interest rate of 2.9%. During the war, over $35 billion worth of saving bonds were sold to the public, in amounts as small as $25.

When Series EE bonds were a Great Deal

Saving bonds were introduced in the early ‘80s. This was a period of rising interest rates, making buying them more striking. These saving bonds had a lifetime, fixed base rate that was put in place every six months for all bonds sold during that time.   The bonds had a “floating rate” portion of the interest, which altered every six months to stay with the established rate on Treasury notes.

How to Open a Savings Account for an Infant

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As a grandparent, you can help reduce some of your infant grandchild’s expenses by opening a savings account for her/him. Health care and college are just 2 examples of expenses that you can provide assistance with by consistently adding to the savings account. In addition, when your grandchild is older, you can aid in teaching them the value of saving by letting them help manage the account. Many banks provide savings accounts that are purposely tailored for kids.

Contact your bank to find out if it has savings accounts especially for children. Make a note of all incentives and benefits that are available and the requirements and minimal balance necessary to open the account.

Call other banks and inquire about their incentives and benefits to open a child’s savings account. Compare your bank’s incentives with the other banks and pick the one that best fits your needs.

Gather the necessary information to open the account. For instance, you need your grandchild’s social security number. If your grandchild doesn’t have a social security number, ask their parents to apply for one as quickly as possible. There are a few financial institutions that let you open an account for your grandchild without it as long as you give it sometime down the line.

Fill out the application and include yourself and/or the parents/guardians if you want them to be on the account. Even though you can visit a bank branch to open the account, many banks let customers fill out the paperwork online. Moreover, you can pick the date that you want your grandchild to gain access to the account on the application. This is very important because if you set it up for college, you want to make sure he or she doesn’t bother the money until then.